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Newswest 9 | Midland, Texas | newswest9.com

MacDill hosts 'expert' after complaints of mold, animal infestations in base housing

Since families went public about toxic living conditions in base housing across the country, the Air Force has taken action.

TAMPA, Fla. — The health of military families on MacDill Air Force Base was up for discussion again.

The meeting came after about a dozen families reported mold and others reported animal infestations in base housing.

An attorney representing about a dozen families who’ve dealt with mold in base housing on MacDill talked with 10Investigates Courtney Robinson about the most recent attempt by the Air Force to address housing problems on MacDill.

Natalie Kwaham attended an information session with a representative from the Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday night at MacDill. The session was hosted by base personnel. 

Kwaham said the overall sentiment after the meeting was frustration. 

She said the EPA representative was not an expert in mold and offered answers that were evasive, ambiguous and often times contradicted advice given to tenants by Harbor Bay. 

Harbor Bay is the private company contracted by the AF to handle housing and housing maintenance on MacDill. 

Speaking on behalf of families, Kwaham said they went to the session looking for answers but left frustrated and confused. 

After families exposed issues with mold earlier this year, both the Air Force and Wing Command at MacDill AFB have vowed to make changes to improve housing for military families.

A PSA from MacDill went out to families encouraging them to attend and get their "mold questions answered by an expert." A base spokesperson told 10news the EPA representative will also talk about other things including air quality and radon.

Since families went public about toxic living conditions in base housing across the country, the Air Force has taken action. The private management company that handles housing on MacDill told 10News in February that they now staff two environmental scientists to review any work to remediate toxins like mold.

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