MIDLAND, Texas — Intersections, roads and drainage systems are big topics for most Midland citizens.

The Midland Development Corporation's board met and approved big-time infrastructure projects on November 4. 

These projects will seek final approval at the November 19th city council meeting. 

"It's key to the future growth of Midland that we continue to develop and work to build out our infrastructure and our roads as our community continues to grow," said MDC Executive Director John Trischitti.

Trischitti said due to a shortage of engineers working for the city, these projects are going to three private companies. 

If approved, consultant Kimley-Horn will draw up plans to urbanize the Briarwood and Wadley intersections with traffic signals. 

They are currently rural intersections with warning lights and stop signs, so this update would give drivers more clear direction.

"A business owner won't come if there's not a road to their business and there's not water and sewer to their business and so that's why the MDC has made that a priority," Trischitti said. 

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If approved, consultant Freese & Nichols will map out an extension of West Wadley to State Highway 158 and assist the city in developing drainage plans. 

According to MDC staff, these project write-ups should take about 10-12 months to get shovel-ready. 

Lastly, if approved, Parkhill Smith and Cooper will plan an extension to Business 20 for Avalon Drive and Thomason Drive, plan development of paved driveways to the airfield gates at the airport and plan to develop the middle of David Mims Parkway. 

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