CAF Vintage Plane Crashes in Colorado - KWES NewsWest 9 / Midland, Odessa, Big Spring, TX: newswest9.com |

CAF Vintage Plane Crashes in Colorado

By Wyatt Goolsby
NewsWest 9

A vintage airplane, owned by the Commemorative Air Force, crashed and caught fire Thursday outside Longmont, Colorado, near Bolder. The CAF is still getting information on exactly what happened, and are waiting before they make an official comment.

However, the director did tell us he's glad no one was killed in the crash. And for Witnesses who saw the plane go down, they were just surprised the pilots were able to walk away from the wreckage.

"When all of a sudden, we saw a plane through that tree, it was about halfway in that level of that tree, hit the ground, boom, right in that field on the other side of my van," explained Jeremy Roff, from Colorado. "And his tires, when he hit the hump in the road here, the tires exploited and flew off the plane. And then it burst into flames and sled into that telephone poll right there."

The people who saw the vintage plane crash in Colorado Thursday got quite a scare.

"It was scary, definitely. I've never seen anything like it before, yeah," said Roff.

The Beech craft Model C-45-H, originally created during the World War II era, had what appeared to be engine problems.

"Like I said, that helicopter pilot said he actually saw the engines stop on the plane up in the air. So, it sounded like it was an engine failure," said Roff.

64-year-old Stanley Peterson and 52-year-old David Gianakos, the two men on board, were the only ones injured in the accident. CAF director, Bob Rice, knew about the wreck, but didn't know yet the pilots had survived. He said that was the most important thing.  Rice gave us a closer look at a model very similar to the plane that crashed this morning. He described it as a sturdy, all-purpose plane.

"It's tried and true, there's still many airplane's like this used this very day, and they are used to transport to a variety of things, you would probably be surprised, everything from mail to in some cases animals, so even to this day," explained Rice.

Rice said CAF sent a public safety officer up to Colorado to find out exactly what happened before the plane went down.
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