The Latest: Watchdog report rebukes Comey for Clinton probe - KWES NewsWest 9 / Midland, Odessa, Big Spring, TX: newswest9.com |

The Latest: Watchdog report rebukes Comey for Clinton probe

(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File). FILE - In this April 6, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in New York. The Justice Department’s internal watchdog is expected to criticize the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email investig... (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File). FILE - In this April 6, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in New York. The Justice Department’s internal watchdog is expected to criticize the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email investig...
  • The Latest: Watchdog report rebukes Comey for Clinton probeMore>>

  • Watchdog: Comey 'insubordinate,' not biased in Clinton probe

    Watchdog: Comey 'insubordinate,' not biased in Clinton probe

    Thursday, June 14 2018 1:17 AM EDT2018-06-14 05:17:40 GMT
    Friday, June 15 2018 12:49 AM EDT2018-06-15 04:49:32 GMT
    (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File). FILE - In this April 6, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in New York. The Justice Department’s internal watchdog is expected to criticize the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email investig...(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File). FILE - In this April 6, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in New York. The Justice Department’s internal watchdog is expected to criticize the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email investig...

    The inspector general's report is set for release Thursday afternoon, the culmination of an 18-month review into one of the most consequential FBI investigations in recent history.

    The inspector general's report is set for release Thursday afternoon, the culmination of an 18-month review into one of the most consequential FBI investigations in recent history.

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Latest on a report by the Justice Department's internal watchdog on the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation (all times local):

9:55 p.m.

The Justice Department has issued a stinging rebuke to the FBI for its handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

The report released Thursday calls former FBI Director James Comey "insubordinate" and says his actions were "extraordinary."

But the report, by the department's watchdog, does not find evidence that Comey was motivated by political bias or preference in his decisions.

The report criticizes Comey for publicly announcing his recommendation against criminal charges for Clinton. It also faults him for alerting Congress days before the 2016 election that the investigation was being reopened because of newly discovered emails.

President Donald Trump has been eager for the report in hopes that it would vindicate his decision to fire Comey and undermine special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

__

5:55 p.m.

FBI Director Christopher Wray is defending the FBI in response to a scathing inspector general report that heavily criticized the actions of his predecessor in the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

Wray says the report only addresses a specific set of facts and the actions of a handful of officials. He says "nothing" in the report "impugns" the integrity of the FBI workforce as a whole.

Wray also says the report found "errors in judgment" and policy violations, but it found no evidence of political bias or improper consideration "actually impacting the investigations under review."

The report released Thursday criticizes former FBI Director James Comey, calling him "insubordinate" and saying he broke with longstanding policy. It also criticizes the politically charged texts of a handful of agents.

___

5:55 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has responded to the Justice Department's inspector general report that found former FBI Director James Comey occasionally used personal email for work.

"But my emails," Clinton said in a three-word tweet.

The Justice Department watchdog revealed Comey's use of personal email in its report about the FBI's handling of the investigation into Clinton's email practices and whether she mishandled classified information as secretary of state.

Comey publicly commented on the investigation in the explosive final months of the 2016 presidential campaign. Clinton has written that those moves contributed to her loss to Donald Trump.

The report released Thursday found there was no evidence that Comey's or the department's actions were motivated by political bias toward either candidate.

___

5:20 p.m.

An FBI attorney was removed from the special counsel's Russia investigation in February after the Justice Department's internal watchdog found he had written anti-Trump messages.

This was in addition to FBI agent Peter Strzok who was removed from the investigation last year after exchanging anti-Trump texts.

The reassignment of the FBI attorney was revealed in the report released Thursday by the Justice Department's inspector general on the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

It identifies the attorney as "FBI Attorney 2" and says he was assigned to the Clinton investigation and also to the investigation into Russian interference.

The report describes some of his messages, including one the day after the election in which he said he was "so stressed about what I could have done differently." In another message, he called then-Vice President-elect Mike Pence "stupid."

Strzok had exchanged his anti-Trump texts with another FBI attorney, Lisa Page, who had already left the special counsel's team when he was reassigned.

___

4:30 p.m.

In a revelation some Democrats see as ironic, the Justice Department's inspector general report about the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation says former Director James Comey occasionally used personal email for work.

In several instances Comey forwarded items to his personal account, including drafts of messages and other unclassified items.

When interviewed by the inspector general, Comey said he used it for word processing at home when he was writing something longer. He said it was "incidental" and he forwarded the emails to his government account.

Comey said he wasn't sure if that was in accordance with FBI regulations, but had checked it with another official and he "had the sense that it was okay."

The inspector general says he did not follow regulations.

__

4:15 p.m.

A lawyer for FBI agent Peter Strzok (struhk) says a watchdog's report shows his politics did not affect an investigation of Hillary Clinton's emails.

Strzok has come under fire for text messages critical of Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign. He left special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian meddling in the election after the Justice Department's inspector general discovered the problematic texts in mid-2017.

On Thursday, a report by the inspector general revealed that Strzok had told an FBI lawyer "we'll stop" Trump from becoming president.

Strzok was also involved in the probe of Clinton's handling of classified emails that roiled the election.

Strzok's lawyer, Aitan Goelman, says Thursday's report reveals no evidence that the FBI agent's political views affected the handling of the Clinton investigation.

___

3:20 p.m.

The White House says a report by the Justice Department's watchdog on the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation is reaffirming President Donald Trump's "suspicions" about former FBI Director James Comey's conduct.

White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders says the inspector general's report is also reaffirming Trump's suspicions about the "political bias among some of the members of the FBI." She is deferring additional comments to FBI Director Christopher Wray.

The report says Comey was "insubordinate" in his conduct of the probe, but it didn't find he was motivated by political bias.

Sanders says Trump was briefed on the report's findings earlier in the day.

___

2:55 p.m.

Former FBI Director James Comey says he disagrees with some of the conclusions of the Justice Department's inspector general about his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

But Comey says in a tweet that he respects the inspector general's work and believes the conclusions are "reasonable." He says "people of good faith" can see the "unprecedented situation differently."

Comey's comments come in response to the public release of a report that is heavily critical of his decisions in the probe. The report says Comey was insubordinate and departed from established protocol numerous times.

The report does find that Comey's actions were not politically motivated to help either candidate.

Comey also wrote an opinion piece in The New York Times responding to the report's findings.

__

2:40 p.m.

An FBI investigator who worked on probes into Hillary Clinton's emails and into Russian interference in the 2016 election told an FBI lawyer "we'll stop" Donald Trump from becoming president.

The inflammatory texts between Peter Strzok and FBI lawyer Lisa Page are highlighted in the report by the Justice Department's inspector general, which is critical of former FBI director James Comey's handling of the investigations.

According to the report, Page texted Strzok in August 2016: "(Trump's) not ever going to become president, right? Right?!"

Strzok responded: "No. No he won't. We'll stop it."

The report says the watchdog "did not find documentary or testimonial evidence" that political bias directly affected parts of the probe, it says Page and Strzok's conduct "cast a cloud over the entire FBI investigation."

__

2:05 p.m.

The Justice Department has issued a stinging rebuke to the FBI for its handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

The report released Thursday calls former FBI Director James Comey "insubordinate" and says his actions were "extraordinary."

But the report, by the department's watchdog, does not find evidence that Comey was motivated by political bias or preference in his decisions.

The report criticized Comey for publicly announcing his recommendation against criminal charges for Clinton. It also faulted him for alerting Congress days before the 2016 election that the investigation was being reopened because of newly discovered emails.

President Donald Trump has been eager for the report in hopes that it would vindicate his decision to fire Comey and undermine special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

__

12:15 p.m.

The Justice Department's watchdog faults former FBI Director James Comey for breaking with established protocol in his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation. But it found that his decisions were not driven by political bias.

The report also criticizes Comey for not keeping then-Attorney General Loretta Lynch and other Justice Department superiors properly informed about his handling of the investigation.

That's according to a person familiar with the report's conclusions who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. The person was not authorized to speak on the record because the report is not yet public.

The report's findings are set to be made public later Thursday. It represents the culmination of an 18-month review into one of the most consequential FBI investigations in recent history.

__ Chad Day in Washington

___

12:15 p.m.

President Donald Trump was expected to receive a briefing at the White House on a report from the Justice Department's internal watchdog on the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein was spotted entering the West Wing on Thursday. White House officials have not yet confirmed that Rosenstein will be conducting the briefing.

The inspector general's detailed report is set to be released later in the day. It will look at how the nonpartisan law enforcement agency became entangled in the 2016 presidential campaign. Trump is expected to use the report to renew his attack against two former top FBI officials - Director James Comey and his deputy, Andrew McCabe.

___

11:55 a.m.

President Donald Trump is bashing the special counsel investigation into Russian election meddling as a "pile of garbage" ahead of the release of a highly anticipated report looking into the Justice Department's conduct during the 2016 election.

Trump says in a pair of tweets that now that he's back from his summit with North Korea, "the thought process must sadly go back to the Witch Hunt."

Trump is yet again insisting there was "No Collusion and No Obstruction of the fabricated No Crime" and is accusing Democrats of making up "a phony crime," paying "a fortune to make the crime sound real," and then "Collud(ing) to make this pile of garbage take on life in Fake News!"

The report by the Justice Department's internal watchdog is being released Thursday afternoon and is expected to criticize the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

___

11:35 a.m.

Two Republican-led House committees say their own monthslong probe into the now-closed FBI investigation of Hillary Clinton's emails has so far shown "questionable decision-making" by the agency.

A document listing preliminary conclusions was obtained by The Associated Press ahead of a separate report from the Justice Department's internal watchdog. That much-anticipated report is due to be released Thursday afternoon. It is expected to criticize the FBI's handling of the investigation.

Republicans on the House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees say they have "substantial questions about whether DOJ and FBI properly analyzed and interpreted the law surrounding mishandling of classified information." They charge that the FBI did not follow legal precedent and treated the Clinton probe differently from other cases.

The Republicans allege bias against Donald Trump in his campaign against Clinton.

- Mary Clare Jalonick

___

1 a.m.

The Justice Department's internal watchdog is releasing its much-anticipated report on the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

The report being issued Thursday afternoon is the culmination of an 18-month review of one of the most consequential FBI investigations in recent history.

Its findings will revive debate about whether FBI actions affected the outcome of the 2016 presidential election and contributed to Clinton's loss to Donald Trump.

Trump's supporters have eagerly awaited the report in hopes that it would skewer the judgment of James Comey, who was fired as FBI director last year.

Among the actions scrutinized is Comey's decision to publicly announce his recommendation against prosecuting Clinton, and his disclosure to Congress days before the election that the investigation was being revived because of newly discovered emails.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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