Emperor penguins find camera, take selfie in Antarctica - KWES NewsWest 9 / Midland, Odessa, Big Spring, TX: newswest9.com |

Emperor penguins find camera, take selfie in Antarctica

Some penguins decided to look deeply into a camera when an Australian researcher left it on the ice. (Source: Australian Antarctic Program/YouTube) Some penguins decided to look deeply into a camera when an Australian researcher left it on the ice. (Source: Australian Antarctic Program/YouTube)

ANTARCTICA (RNN) -  The urge to "selfie" apparently is more than just human nature.

Some Emperor penguins took up interest in a camera when Eddie Gault, an Australian Antarctic expeditioner, left it on the ice while at Auster Rookery near Australia’s Mawson research station.

In the video, you can hear them making what can only be described as inquiring chirps while staring into the camera.

Eventually, they look up and start shaking their heads back and forth.

Of course, the Twitterverse loved the short videos.

The Emperors are the largest of the penguin species, and they live and breed in one of the most inhospitable environments on the planet. 

One of the many goals of the Australian government's Australian Antarctic program is to study these penguins' lives and how human activities may impact them.

Emperor penguin populations are expected to decline in coming years as part of the effects of climate change, the Australian government said.

Copyright 2018 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

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