Massage Envy 'shaken' by reported sexual misconduct at spas - KWES NewsWest 9 / Midland, Odessa, Big Spring, TX: newswest9.com |

Massage Envy 'shaken' by reported sexual misconduct at spas

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) - Officials at Arizona-based Massage Envy said Tuesday that reports of sexual misconduct at its franchise spas are "heartbreaking" and the company is strengthening screening and reporting procedures.

The release of a six-point plan by the national company based in Scottsdale follows an investigative report last week by BuzzFeed News .

Massage Envy CEO Joe Magnacca said during a conference call with reporters that the company is committed to providing good care for its clients and keeping them safe.

"It has shaken us," he said of the allegations.

Magnacca said the company has a loyal membership but has seen a relatively moderate drop-off of membership since the BuzzFeed report.

Message Envy's plan includes bolstering background screening of all massage therapists and requiring that franchises provide law enforcement contact information to clients making an allegation of sexual assault, officials said.

BuzzFeed said more than 180 people across the United States have filed sexual assault lawsuits, police reports and other sexual misconduct complaints against Massage Envy spas, employees and the company itself.

The website reported that many of those who complained believed their claims were mishandled or ignored by employees and owners of individual Massage Envy spas and by the company.

Dozens of women reported digital and oral penetration. More than 100 reported that massage therapists groped their genitals and breasts, or committed other explicit violations.

Along with providing contact information for law enforcement, franchises will provide a private room for clients to call authorities, Magnacca said.

Melanie Hansen, Massage Envy's general counsel, said no franchise should discourage clients from reporting sexual misconduct, but the company is not requiring franchises to report clients' allegations of sexual misconduct to law enforcement.

"We believe that should be a victim's choice," she said.

Hansen declined to comment on the litigation.

Magnacca said Massage Envy's next steps include forming an advisory council to develop, maintain and implement strong standards and creating a new corporate department to oversee safety policies.

"We realize that for us, it will never be enough," he said.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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