Midland Dive Association dives to view the solar eclipse - KWES NewsWest 9 / Midland, Odessa, Big Spring, TX: newswest9.com |

Midland Dive Association dives to view the solar eclipse

(Source: Midland Dive Association) (Source: Midland Dive Association)
(Source: Midland Dive Association) (Source: Midland Dive Association)
(Source: Midland Dive Association) (Source: Midland Dive Association)
(Source: Midland Dive Association) (Source: Midland Dive Association)
(Source: Midland Dive Association) (Source: Midland Dive Association)
BALMORHEA, TX (KWES) -

A rare phenomenon will soon sweep across the sky.

Although we'll see a percentage of it and not the full eclipse, many West Texans are preparing to view it on Monday. One group in particular is also preparing, except they're going 20 feet deeper.

"You know, surprisingly, being in the desert, there's a big society of divers in Midland and Odessa," said Sarah Anderson, owner and instructor of the Midland Dive Association. "I was in the Navy, I got injured, so I wanted to bring what I experienced from diving to Midland and let people enjoy it."

The Midland Dive Association will be scuba diving at Balmorhea State Park tomorrow to get an in-depth look at the sky below the waves.
"One of the things we want to do is take a picture of it from underwater," said scuba diver John Kerrigan who will also be diving with the Midland Dive Association on Monday. "We figure it'd be something different and thought we'd give it a try."

"It's peaceful down there, it's like an escape," said another scuba diver, Bobbie Kerrigan.

Divers will be observing marine life and looking at any changes while underwater .

"NASA is saying you're going to feel about 2% lighter," said Anderson. "We're going to see how the fish react and see how it changes our buoyancy."

But being underwater, safety is still key. Divers are still going to need eye protection from the infrared and ultraviolet rays.

"We've taken scuba masks and put proper film on the scuba masks so when they're surfacing or underwater, when they look at the sun, they're going to be protected," said Anderson.

This particular way of viewing the sun only comes once in a blue moon.

"It's kind of an experiment but a once-in-a-lifetime experience," said Anderson. "It's just amazing to see the underwater world."

If you're interested in joining the club, you can click here.

For more information on the viewing party, you can contact the Midland Dive Association at (432) 556-9589.

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