How to watch the eclipse with cheap items from home - KWES NewsWest 9 / Midland, Odessa, Big Spring, TX: newswest9.com |

How to watch the eclipse with cheap items from home

(Source: Pixabay) (Source: Pixabay)
MIDLAND, TX (KWES) -

Many of us grew up with our parents making it clear, "don't stare at the sun." That piece of advice may seem obvious now, but what about when there's an eclipse?

Just because it could be a once in a lifetime event, doesn't mean it's suddenly okay for your eyes. Even you don't notice the damage.

"Even if they don't feel pain or even if they don't think anything bad happened, they could have damage to their eyeball and so forth that won't show up until months later," said Daryl Lane.

Lane, a long-time West Texas Astronomer club member, helps with star parties, gives presentations and just about anything he can to educate the public. 

We spoke with Daryl about the different ways to look at Monday's total solar eclipse, which is the first one of its kind in 100 years.

Daryl said there's a number of ways you can get a good look at the eclipse, with one of the most popular methods being a pinhole camera, which you can make without leaving your house.

"The easiest way is to take a cardboard box, make a very tiny hole, and then at the back of the box, you take a white piece of paper, you glue it to the other edge," said Lane. "Then, when you hold that up to the sun, the suns rays will pass through the pinhole, hit the white piece of paper at the back and it will show you a silhouette of the sun."

Another way is those glasses you've probably seen advertised just about everywhere. These glasses are available online and plenty of other places, but it's important to make sure you can find some with legitimate solar lenses. 

"A proper pair of eclipse glasses has an ISO number," said Lane. "The number is proceeded by the letters ISO and then a five, or six, digit number and if that is on the back of your glasses, then it should be OK."

The eclipse begins in Midland around 11 a.m. and continues until 2:30. However, the best time to look will be around 1 p.m.

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