Report: 3 landspout tornadoes touch down in West Texas on Sunday - KWES NewsWest 9 / Midland, Odessa, Big Spring, TX: newswest9.com |

Report: 3 landspout tornadoes touch down in West Texas on Sunday

Tornado touches down in Upton County. (Source: Nikki Parker/Facebook) Tornado touches down in Upton County. (Source: Nikki Parker/Facebook)
(KWES) -

The National Weather Service in Midland has released their report from Sunday's severe weather over Reagan and Upton County.

The reports were received between 7 p.m. and 8:15 p.m. CDT.

The first reported landspout tornado was rated an EF0 and lasted from around 7:05 p.m. until 7:13 p.m. CDT. The landspout touched down one to two miles south of U.S. Highway 67, roughly 14 miles east of Big Lake and continued westward through open fields in southeast portions of Upton County. Meteorologists said the tornado was narrow, about 50-75 yards in width. No damage was reported.

The second reported landspout tornado was also rated an EF0. We're told it touched down around 8 p.m. CDT. This tornado was very short lived and went undetected on radar. No damage was reported with this.

The third reported landspout tornado was around 8:05 p.m. CDT. This tornado was reported by law enforcement just east of State Highway 137, roughly 20-25 miles north of the city of Big Lake. Meteorologists said this tornado was also brief and caused no damage.

All tornado reports are rated based upon the Enhanced Fujita or EF scale. Each tornado is rated based upon estimated wind speeds and related damage.

The following is the scale that is used to rate tornadoes:

EF0         65-85 miles per hour
EF1         86-110 miles per hour
EF2         111-135 miles per hour
EF3         136-165 miles per hour
EF4         166-200 miles per hour
EF5         Over 200 miles per hour

According to the National Weather Service, a landspout is a tornado that does not arise from organized storm-scale rotation and therefore is not associated with a wall cloud (visually) or a mesocyclone (radar). Landspouts typically are observed beneath cumulonimbus or towering cumulus clouds, and essentially are the land-based equivalents of waterspouts.

Copyright 2017 KWES. All rights reserved. 

Powered by Frankly