State of Texas seeing high rates of women diagnosed with cervical cancer

State of Texas seeing high rates of women diagnosed with cervical cancer

(KWES) - The human papillomavirus, or HPV,  is the most common type of a sexually transmitted infection. Most who carry the infection don't even know they have it. Although HPV causes no symptoms, some types of HPV can cause warts or even cervical cancer.

Doctors say HPV infections can go away on their own between one to two years, but the virus can still linger if not treated.

Before, it was recommended the HPV vaccine should be given in three doses. Now, the Center for Disease Control recommends 11 to 12-year-old girls and boys should get two doses instead. The vaccine can be given as early as nine years old.

In Texas, about 64% of girls started receiving the HPV vaccine series while 49% of boys started receiving theirs.

Texas is one of the few states that has the highest rates of women that were diagnosed and died from cervical cancer. However, there's still faith. The American Cancer Society says that if treated at its early stages, it is one of the most successfully treated.
 
If you are sexually active, doctors say to get a Pap test to screen for cervical cancer.

Women should get screened with a Pap test once every three years if they're aged 21 to 65. They could also get screen with both a Pap test and an HPV test once every five years from the ages of 30 to 65.

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