Protesters walk for the battle against the Trans-Pecos Pipeline - KWES NewsWest 9 / Midland, Odessa, Big Spring, TX: newswest9.com |

Protesters walk for the battle against the Trans-Pecos Pipeline

American Indian Movement of Central Texas fight for justice. (Source: KWES) American Indian Movement of Central Texas fight for justice. (Source: KWES)
Protesters chanting against the pipeline. (Source: KWES) Protesters chanting against the pipeline. (Source: KWES)
Tribe leaders and protesters stand at pipeline construction site. (Source: KWES) Tribe leaders and protesters stand at pipeline construction site. (Source: KWES)
Protesters walk 3.2 miles. (Source: KWES) Protesters walk 3.2 miles. (Source: KWES)
ALPINE, TX (KWES) -

No more pipelines.

That's what protesters and the American Indian Movement of Central Texas are saying.

"All the pipelines coming through Texas are destroying native burial sites," said protester Fox Redsky from Austin.

It's a two year battle with Alpine residents and protesters fighting against the Trans-Pecos Pipeline. The 148 mile long pipeline designed to transport natural gas through Pecos, Brewster and Presidio county. But those against the pipeline, still haven't given up on that land.

"They're using our public land trust," said protester Oshawanna Whiteeagle, descendent of the Bidai Tribe. "These are lands and resources that belong to all the people of Texas."

Alpine protesters fighting the pipeline marched in solidarity Friday morning including protesters from across the state and tribe leaders. They're all fighting for one thing.

"They have no regard for no race, they have no regard for no tradition," said Peter Hefflin with the American Indian Movement of Central Texas. 

The pipeline, run by Energy Transfer Partners, dug up a 5,000 year old archaeological site last week without negotiating. Protesters are enraged.

"They think they're superior than everybody else," said Hefflin. "We don't go to their burial grounds and dig up their ancestors."

Those who are against the project suggest switching to solar energy, fearing the pipeline can rupture and contaminate water.

"Not only do the pipelines leak, there's also leaks in the pumping station," said Jumano Apache Tribe Tribal Historian Enrique Madrid.

Others fear the pipeline's safety hazards, especially for residents and families living near the project. 

"Listen to the land," said Lori Glover with Defend Big Bend. "Because we have to take care of this place for generations to come."

As for the American Indian movement of Central Texas, they have one thing to say to those working behind the pipeline.

"You have nothing at all," said Hefflin. "Not when it comes to the people. We will defeat you. We will defeat you, we will take you down and then you'll be coming to us for help."

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